USFCAM In the NEWS

USFCAM | Trenton Doyle Hancock "We Done All We Could and None of It's Good" Opening
USFCAM | Trenton Doyle Hancock "We Done All We Could and None of It's Good" Opening Night

Local publications Creative Loafing and TBO have been presenting the museum with high praises recently. We’ve got the highlights below.

Creative Loafing has bestowed a Best of the Bay award to the USF Contemporary Art Museum. Here’s what they said about the museum:

BEST INCUBATOR OF UP-AND-COMING ARTISTS
USF Contemporary Art Museum
USFCAM manages to stay impressively ahead of the curve in charting current trends in the visual arts, hosting shows by such of-the-moment artists as Trenton Doyle Hancock. But it’s CAM’s affiliation with USF that keeps it on the cutting edge. The annual shows by graduating Masters of Fine Arts students are possibly the most anticipated of the year, allowing visitors to view works that these students have been developing for years. See the original article here.

TBO placed USFCAM in the good company of the Dali Museum, Ringling and other area art institutions with a recommendation to visit:

USF Contemporary Art Museum
This-hard-to-get-to museum on the University of South Florida campus is worth the hassle if you enjoy cutting edge art. It brings in thought-provoking exhibits — including video works, installation art and graffiti. Permits are required for parking on campus. Purchase one at the main entrance. Read full article here.

Now, not everyone has a hard time finding the museum, but if you use MapQuest or Google Maps using our physical address, you may run into some trouble. So, we’ve got a handy map for you!

Map to USF Contemporary Art Museum
Map to USF Contemporary Art Museum

So be sure to support your local art community and visit the museum soon! Our current show is The Talent Show and will be on display until December 10, 2011!

The Talent Show | September 30 - December 10 | USFCAM

The Talent Show
September 30 – December 10, 2011

The Talent Show explores the competing desires of notoriety and privacy, and the evolving relationship between artists and audiences in our culture of reality television and Web-based social media. For almost half a century, artists have modeled and exploited these desires and dramatized the complex dynamics that surround them, often engaging people to participate in their work—both with and without their knowledge. Click for more.

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