83Degrees Explores the USFCAM Art in Health Program

The USF Art in Health program, a collaborative project that unites the USFCAM museum USF Health, was featured in a recent article in 83Degrees. The program, modeled after similar initiatives at Harvard University and University of Miami, was founded in 2012 and since hosted 86 students from disciplines including medicine, public health, pharmacy, physical therapy, social work and speech-language pathology.

Collage, drawing and visual observation exercises

Art in Health seeks to encourage health students, ranging from doctors to nurses and therapists, to improve their observational skills. USF College of Public Health faculty member Aurora Sanchez Anguiano, Ph.D., says that “observation is the key in all of the health sciences” and that the program encourages students to stop and think before coming to conclusions, a vital skill for future health practitioners.

Megan Voeller, Associate Curator of Education at USF CAM and program director of Art in Health, uses the Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) discussion method with the students to “improve critical thinking, listening, communication and visual observation.”

“It’s also about mindfulness and the ability to reflect and focus,” says Voeller. In addition to a museum-based workshop using VTS, the program includes workshops in studio art and movement.

Feedback suggests that the program strikes a chord with students. Julia Zhang, a current medical student and Art in Health workshop attendee, said that her participation in the program allowed her to “look at things from a different perspective.”

You can read the full story here: USF Leverages Arts, Sciences To Provide Better Healthcare

More About USF Art in Health

Body awareness, movement observation and practice

In partnership with USF Health, the USF Contemporary Art Museum offers a series of workshops designed to improve the observation skills of USF graduate and professional students in health disciplines. Join other USF students for intensive, inter-professional arts-based training in observation, critical thinking and communication. Research shows that training health practitioners in art skills improves visual awareness. Each workshop includes a series of arts activities and a concluding discussion led by a USF Health faculty member. Visiting faculty members for Spring 2014 include Dr. Frazier Stevenson, Morsani College of Medicine (Studio Art workshop) and Dr. Aurora Sanchez-Anguiano, College of Public Health (Museum workshop).

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Pedro Reyes Legislative Theatre Performance Amendment to the Amendment: (Under)stand Your Ground Sought Common Ground

Attendees of the Pedro Reyes Amendment to the Amendment: (Under)stand Your Ground made revisions to the 2nd Amendment of the US Constitution

Attendees of the Pedro Reyes Amendment to the Amendment: (Under)stand Your Ground made revisions to the 2nd Amendment of the US Constitution

Thank You!!
Thanks to everyone who was involved in USFCAM’s project with Pedro Reyes on January 23, 2014!

The performance was truly a collaborative effort that included USF College of the Arts faculty and students. The USF percussion ensemble and jazz combos played Reyes’ unique instruments, crafted from firearms confiscated and disabled by the Mexican Army, which are on view at USFCAM in the exhibition CAM@25: Social Engagement through March 8. Everyone who attended the sold-out event was invited to participate in the performance, which was created by Reyes in partnership with USF Theatre professor Dora Arreola, and USF and Community Stepping Stones students, to encourage dialogue and address issues related to the Second Amendment.

As the audience entered the black box theatre, USF and Community Stepping Stones students directed the 100-plus audience members to sit in seats arranged in circles of eight on what is usually considered the stage, inverting the traditional audience/performer paradigm. Inspired by Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed, this structure transformed the audience from spectators into “spect-actors” and collaborators in the performance. USF and Community Stepping Stones students performed a sketch, developed in a series of workshops with Reyes and Arreola, inviting the audience to engage in a democratic exercise to amend and update the Second Amendment in an effort to reduce gun violence.

For reference:

The Second Amendment: A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

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The participants included a broad spectrum of community members, USF faculty and students. The discussions were lively and energetic, with participants sharing their beliefs and experiences with guns in respectful and productive ways, and while opinions were varied, there was still much common ground to work from in each of the participating groups.

After 30 minutes of discussion, the students facilitators invited one representative from each group to present their proposed revisions of the Second Amendment. Most groups felt the concept of the well-regulated militia was out-dated and needed to be revised or removed entirely. Many groups presented specific proposals including education, minimum age requirements and background checks, as well as raising issues about the power of the NRA and mental health issues in their revisions. One group decided the amendment should not be changed, but the majority included some form of regulation of firearms in their revised amendments.

Example Revised Amendment:

“A well regulated military being necessary for the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be prohibited but shall be regulated to protect the security of the people from the will of the individual.”

The event took place just one week after a fatal shooting in a Tampa Bay area movie theatre resulted from an argument between two patrons over texting (story, story) and within months of a failed effort to revise and repeal Stand Your Ground laws in the Florida Legislature (story). Providing a safe space to engage in challenging dialogue about critical social issues, Amendment to the Amendment: (Under)stand Your Ground succeeded in starting a conversation we hope continues.

Video to Come
Stay tuned for video of the revised amendments which will be posted here and on our IRAUSF youtube channel in the future.


To learn more about Pedro’s work , check out the media coverage:
Media: Amendment to the Amendment: (Under)stand Your Ground
NPR Story: “Artist Transforms Guns To Make Music — Literally
WUSF Radio University Beat: Gun Music
FOX News pre-performance report
Tampa Bay Times: Artist Turns Guns Into Music with a Message


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CAM@25: Social Engagement in the News

Janaina Tschape, still from Blood, Sea, 2004, four-channel video installation. The work was shot at Weeki Wachee Springs.

Janaina Tschape, still from Blood, Sea, 2004, four-channel video installation. The work was shot at Weeki Wachee Springs.

CAM is getting a lot of ink for our current exhibition CAM@25: Social Engagement. This exhibition features some of our most talked about work from our past 25 years. Even the New York Times has mentioned the show in their “Gun Report” segment, which sadly includes the victims of gun violence each day. Here is a list of stories we’ve found covering the show with an outtake from each article:

CAM@25: A Social Function | Creative Loafing | January 15, 2014

“The University of South Florida’s Contemporary Art Museum is an arts institution in touch with the sights and sounds of today’s society, presenting works that turn perceived realities on their ear via meticulously appointed shows and prestigious showcases of international artists…Run by the USF Institute of Research in Art, the free (yes, free) museum is open six days a week, Monday-Saturday. It is (or should be) a point of regional pride, an antidote to all the facepalm-inducing crime stories, political snafus and trashy foibles more commonly associated with Tampa Bay.”

University Beat: Gun Music | WUSF Radio | January 22, 2014

“…You’ve heard the phrase “turning swords into plowshares.” Artist Pedro Reyes embraces that concept by taking firearms that had been confiscated and rendered useless by the Mexican army and turning them into musical instruments.”

Concert, Art Exhibition: Guns Turned Into Musical Instruments | WUSF online

“”…Same as a shovel plants a tree, a musical instrument is also something that is alive,” Reyes says. “Every time you use it, you generate a new sound, a new event and people can gather around the music and I believe that just instruments are kind of the diametrically opposite to what a gun is – like, the guns are the rule of fear and music is the rule of trust.””

Artist Transforms Guns To Make Music - Literally | NPR | January 25, 2014

“…Dominic Walker and Teague Bechtel, both guitarists in the university’s graduate jazz program, are playing what look like steel guitars fashioned from 9 mm semiautomatic handguns. “That was pretty surprising the first time that we went and saw them,” Bechtel says. Laughing, Walker adds, “We just make sure the safety’s on.”

USF Contemporary Art Museum celebrates with ‘Social Engagement’ | Tampa Bay Times | January 29, 2014

“…The subtitle of this show, “Social Engagement,” is a vast and inclusive term. The art chosen for the show gives us many entry points for such engagement, from the simple pleasure of watching something vibrant visually to deeper ruminations about the social problems of our time.”

The Gun Report | NYTimes.com | January 29, 2014

“…Reyes said he wants people to think about the availability of guns in the United States, and the impact they have in Mexico. The project began six years ago in Culiacán, which collected 1,527 guns that Reyes melted to create art.”

More about CAM@25: Social Engagement
The USF Contemporary Art Museum celebrates its 25th anniversary with CAM@25: Social Engagement to highlight its history of bringing artists, and the practice of making contemporary art, to the Tampa Bay community. This selection of installations serves to mark CAM’s extensive history of exhibitions, commissions and collaborations with artists whose practices and projects embrace an ethos of responsible social meaning, purpose and motivation in the public sphere. Artists include Los Carpinteros (Cuba/Spain), Pedro Reyes (Mexico), and Janaina Tschäpe (Brazil/Germany).

Press Release pdf | Exhibition brochure pdf

Pedro Reyes, Imagine [2012] installed at USFCAM. photo: Peter Foe

Pedro Reyes, Imagine [2012] installed at USFCAM. photo: Peter Foe

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Reviews of USFCAM “SubRosa: The Language of Resistance” Exhibition

Zanele Muholi, Katlego Mashiloane and Nasipho Lavuta, Ext. 2, Lakeside, Johannesburg, from the series Being, 2007, Lambda print, 30” x 30.” Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York.

Zanele Muholi, Katlego Mashiloane and Nasipho Lavuta, Ext. 2, Lakeside, Johannesburg, from the series Being, 2007, Lambda print, 30” x 30.” Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York.

SubRosa: The Language of Resistance is still on view at USFCAM. Be sure to check out the exhibition before it’s gone December 7th! Here’s a bit from the press on the USFCAM exhibition: Creative Loafing | Review: “SubRosa Reaches the Age of Dissent” Art corespondent Julie Garisto reviews SubRosa for Creative Loafing

Throughout SubRosa, absurdity mixes with tragedy, demystifying the injustices so that the viewer doesn’t feel completely overcome. Best of all, you come away with a more nuanced view of the plights of others and the artists portraying them. Capping off a successful series of tours, talks and even a Pecha Kucha, two of SubRosa’s final events will take place next week — a screening of the documentary Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry, on Wed., Nov. 13, at Tampa Theatre, and a curator’s tour at noon on Thurs., Nov. 14. Admission to USF CAM is free, and art lovers should be thankful for that. SubRosa, like the human lives it addresses, is priceless. More>>

Art Districts Magazine | Interview with Curator Noel Smith Art Districts online interviews SubRosa’s curator, Noel Smith, about why she wanted to bring this show here to Tampa.

Ashley Knight – Why does your selection mainly include artists from peripheral countries? Noel Smith – I really did not think in terms of “peripheral” and “nonperipheral” when I was choosing the works for the show, although I can see why you might ask that. Rather, I was looking for very accomplished artists who, for one reason or another, feel that they must approach their art from a “subrosa” perspective; I was looking for activist artists who have important things to say about political, societal and cultural aspects of their countries that they do not agree with, who encounter resistance, but who nevertheless speak their minds. The germ of the idea, as I indicated in question No. 2, began with art from Cuba and China, so I think that we followed that line. Certainly there are many artists from Western core countries that work with similar ideas and there are, I am sure, more and powerful shows to be done that would be much different from “SubRosa.” More>>

SubRosa: The Language of Resistance August 26 – December 7, 2013  USF Contemporary Art Museum

SubRosa: The Language of Resistance
August 26 – December 7, 2013
USF Contemporary Art Museum

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WEDU “Arts Plus” Features USFCAM’s SubRosa Exhibition

[ by Steffanie Munguia | Sophomore Biology Major and Honor Student ]

Margaret Miller and Noel Smith discuss the SubRosa exhibition at USFCAM

Margaret Miller and Noel Smith discuss the SubRosa exhibition at USFCAM | Click image to view video

Have you visited the current exhibition at the Contemporary Art Museum, SubRosa: The Language of Resistance? If not, you still have time to check it out. The show runs till December 7th, 2013.

The exhibition has created local buzz, prompting a feature on WEDU’s “Arts Plus.” The crew from WEDU visited the exhibition and compiled a short video including an interview with Noel Smith and Margaret Miller with highlights from SubRosa. Whether you plan to come in and see the exhibition or not, be sure to watch this great clip!

SubRosa highlights works of dissident artists from six countries: Iran, China, Palestine, Equatorial Guinea, South Africa, and Cuba. Though separated by thousands of miles, each of the featured artists share a common theme, using art to express opposition to political oppression.

Along with the cultural diversity represented in SubRosa, there is also great diversity in the mediums chosen by the artists. Ramon Esono Ebale (Equatorial Guinea) is a self-taught graphic novelist, while Cuban artists Jose Toirac and Meira Marrero’s works include a series of sculptures.

Watch the full broadcast here: http://video.wedu.org/video/2365104560/

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Art and Ice | Week of Welcome at USFCAM!

[ by Steffanie Munguia | Sophomore Biology Major ]

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As the new academic year began at the University of South Florida, USFCAM hosted a Week of Welcome event to kick off the art season! Luckily for students, classes were not the only exciting thing they had to look forward to. The USF Contemporary Art Museum opened up their newest exhibition, Subrosa: The Language of Resistance, on the first day of classes.

Two days later, nearly two hundred students flocked to preview the new exhibition. The two-hour event was a huge success, with students of all different backgrounds coming to enjoy the art – and of course, the snow cones and ice pops. Subrosa features pieces from contemporary artists around the world who, through their individual mediums, have communicated a singular message of strength and opposition against repression and the cultural status quo.

“I didn’t expect comic panels to be in CAM,” said Caitlin Lochner, a senior Creative Writing major. “It was interesting to see the different mediums used to express resistance to oppression.”

Attendees also got to participate in a scavenger hunt through the museum while taking a little closer look at the artwork.

Subrosa: The Language of Resistance will remain on display at the USF Contemporary Art Museum through December 7th. For more information about the featured artists and future events at USFCAM, please visit the USFCAM website

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Photos courtesy of USF College of the Arts

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Exhibition Reception Friday at USFCAM | SubRosa: The Language of Resistance

SUbRosaEvents

SubRosa: The Language of Resistance is now open to the public at the USF Contemporary Art Museum. Our official opening reception is Friday, August 30th, and we hope to see you there!

The exhibition, curated by Noel Smith, examines the art and language of artists in response to social, political, and environmental repression. Although the political agency of art is regularly debated, there is a growing group of artists today who make work with political agency and relevancy in mind. Covering continents and cultures, these artists share a desire to question dominant political systems and the prevalent status quo, sometimes covertly and dangerously. More broadly, SubRosa, titled for the Latin phrase meaning secrecy, poses several questions about the role of art in political life.

You’re probably familiar with at least one of the artists who have work in the exhibition. But we wanted to share a bit about an artist you may not be immediately familiar with, Iranian artist Barbad Golshiri. Golshiri will soon have a solo exhibition entitled Curriculum Mortis at Thomas Erben Gallery in New York. Thanks to your local university museum, you don’t have to buy a plane ticket to see work from happening contemporary artists!

Barbad Golshiri

Barbad Golshiri is a contemporary artist who was born in 1982 in Tehran, Iran. He continues to work and live in Tehran, even as his work is considered controversial in the place he calls home.

"Tombstone for Borges' Assassinated Translator"  (Ahmad Mir-Alaei) 2012

“Tombstone for Borges’ Assassinated Translator”
(Ahmad Mir-Alaei), 2012
Engraving on stone, ~ 60 x ~ 81 x ~ 10 cm

Thomas Erben in collaboration with Aaran Gallery, is excited to present Curriculum Mortis, a sculptural installation of a cemetery, by Iranian multimedia artist Barbad Golshiri, his second solo exhibition with the gallery after Nothing Is Left to Tell in 2010. As one of the most prominent figures on the Iranian contemporary scene, over the past ten years Golshiri has produced esthetically and conceptually provocative art, in an impressive balancing act between political urgency and repressive conditions.

Considering the urgent presence of the body, with all its most primal and visceral functions, death has played an important if understated part throughout Golshiri’s art. In Curriculum Mortis, it becomes the main theme through which all other aspects are filtered, as physical bodies are replaced with tombstones, turning the gallery into a graveyard. How do we deal with the loss of those close to us, when they are killed under unclear circumstances, in a society where no authority can be trusted? Golshiri approaches each death individually, creating grave markers so closely attuned as to become physical manifestations of the people they commemorate. Tombstone for Borges’ Assassinated Translator, for example, incorporates engravings referring to the stories translated by Ahmad Mir-Alaei, a well-known translator who disappeared and was later found dead, allegedly from cardiac arrest. By creating these tombstones, Golshiri gives voice to those whose words have forcibly been taken from us, and gives them a renewed physical presence in the world, refusing to forget.

As Dad as Possible, as Dad as Beckett 2000 – 2013 Iron, ashes 200.3 x 100.2 x 28.3 cm

As Dad as Possible, as Dad as Beckett
2000 – 2013
Iron, ashes
200.3 x 100.2 x 28.3 cm

Not all graves commemorate victims of oppression; as is true for Golshiri’s production as a whole, this series of tombs reverberate with subtext, and the artist’s own personal history is as deeply entwined in the work as the histories of the dead. There is the grave of Samuel Beckett, whom Golshiri has translated into Persian; a stone with the epitaph “[There is] no God”; a Tombstone of Jan van Eyck; and finally Golshiri’s own tombstone. Walking through this makeshift graveyard, we are moving through a mindscape of the artist; each grave presents a portal into worlds beyond the present one, where transformation is possible and all can – finally – be different.

Barbad Golshiri’s solo exhibition in New York Curriculum Mortis
Thomas Erben Gallery in collaboration with Aaran Gallery
runs September 7 – October 26, 2013

The Distribution of the Sacred System 2010 Installation and aktion Silk screen print on canvas, 180 x 69 cm, unlimited editions Iron pulley: ∅ 150 cm, length: approx. 240 cm

The Distribution of the Sacred System
2010
Installation and aktion
Silk screen print on canvas, 180 x 69 cm, unlimited editions
Iron pulley: ∅ 150 cm, length: approx. 240 cm

You can see work from Barbad Golrishi at the USF Contemporary Art Museum right now!

"SubRosa: The Language of Resistance" Installation at USFCAM |  August 26 – December 7, 2013

“SubRosa: The Language of Resistance” | August 26 – December 7, 2013 at USFCAM
Artists: Ai Weiwei (China), José Toirac and Meira Marrero (Cuba), Barbad Golshiri (Iran), Ramón Esono Ebalé (Equatorial Guinea), Khaled Jarrar (Palestine), and Zanele Muholi (South Africa)

SubRosa Colloquium: Friday, August 26th 6:00-7:00pm
Exhibition Reception: Friday, August 26th 7:00-9:00pm
Exhibition Dates: Friday, August 26 – December 7, 2013
Location: USF Contemporary Art Museum
For more info: usfcam.usf.edu

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Allan McCollum’s “Petrified Lightning” to be Included in Brazilian Biennial

Allan McCollum's Petrified Lightning from Central Florida project, developed for an exhibition at USFCAM and MOSI, will be showing at the Mercosul Visual Arts Biennial (Brazil)

Allan McCollum’s Petrified Lightning from Central Florida project, developed for exhibitions at USFCAM and MOSI, will be showing at the Mercosul Visual Arts Biennial in Brazil in September 2013

Artist Allan McCollum has been included in the Mercosul Visual Arts Biennial in Brazil for a project that was first shown here at the USFCAM. The project, Petrified Lightning from Central Florida (1997-1998), was commissioned as part of the Hillsborough County’s Public Art Program and opened at USFCAM in Fall of 1998. Our exhibition was accompanied by a simultaneous exhibit and presentation on the project at the Tampa Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI).

How to Turn Lightning Into Art in a Central Florida Summer
While the official title may be disputed, some still consider Tampa the lightning capital of the world. But how can an artist capture the essence of lightning?

“It’s hard to imagine how memory and meaning could exist without language — both are always only available through some sort of representation. I imagine that objects having meaning — artworks, keepsakes, people, stones — could not exist for us without their “literature.” How could a bolt of lightning, lasting only for the tiniest fraction of a second, be understood otherwise? Events this brief will always evade our synapses — and their existence will always only exist after the fact, amongst one’s representations. Perhaps a true picture of how an artwork has meaning could be constructed if the literature supporting the artwork was put on display at the same time, along with it. The Petrified Lightning project was created to explore this idea — an exhibition to enact the “event” as always already absent, with the residue and the meaning always already appearing in its place.” — Allan McCollum

Here’s an excerpt from McCollum’s website about how he was able to harness the creative power of lightning. Warning, do not try this at home!

Allan McCollum shoots rockets into the air to create a lightning strike

Allan McCollum shoots rockets into the air to create a lightning strike

“…To produce the Petrified Lightning project, Allan McCollum collaborated with both a geologist and an electrical engineer from the University of Florida’s International Lightning Research Facility at Camp Blanding, near the small town of Starke, Florida. With the help of the team at the center, McCollum spent the summer of 1997 triggering lightning strikes by launching small rockets with hair-thin copper wires trailing behind them directly into storm clouds as they passed overhead. The triggered lightning bolts were directed down the wires into various containers prepared by the artist that were filled with Central Florida minerals donated by a local sand mining operation. The bolts instantly liquefy a column of sand with temperatures up to 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit, which immediately re-congeals into a column of naturally created glass that exactly duplicates the path of the lightning bolt. These are then dug out by the artist in manner similar to the way a paleontologist might remove a fragile fossil from its matrix. These rootlike glass structures are called fulgurites, or sometimes, petrified lightning….”

Learn more, and see photos from the project Petrified Lightning from Central Florida.

Petrified Lightning from Central Florida (1997-1998) will be on view in Brazil from September 13 to November 10, 2013. We are very proud to have contributed to this partnership between cultural institutions in Tampa and other art venues around the world.

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Geandy Pavón, Ananké: El héroe y las moiras / Ananké: The Hero and the Fates, 2009. Occupying, Building, Thinking

We have not one, but TWO exhibitions for you to enjoy this Summer! Avoid the heat and drizzle and check out some revolutionary art at USFCAM! Join us for our receptions and enjoy beverages and good company.


Occupying, Building, Thinking: Poetic and Discursive Perspectives on Contemporary Cuban Video Art (1990-2010)
June 7 – August 3, 2013
@USFCAM

This exhibition of videos by Cuban artists working worldwide invites contemplation of what it means to occupy (a home, a plot of land, a city, a society…) and the relationship between occupying and building and the concept of the work of art in today’s global culture. Three interconnected segments pose the question of how to reinvent a language for imagining what is public, private and intimate in a culture like Cuba’s, where civil society has been supplanted by the State. Concept and Video Curation by Dennys Matos; Exhibition Curated by Noel Smith; Environment by Vanessa Diaz; Organized by USFCAM.


Paul Robinson: Form of Absence x-rays | paintings | reliquaries
June 7 – August 3, 2013
@USFCAM

Main Entry, Jože Ple?nik House & Atelier, Ljubljana, Slovenia. Paul Robinson

Paul O. Robinson is an artist and architect living and teaching in Ljubljana, Slovenia, whose research concerns transformative methods of representation using artifactual and indexial sources. Form of Absence references the work of the Slovene architect Jože Pležnik, known for his abstracted classical forms built in Prague, Vienna and throughout Slovenia. The exhibition proposes that the accessible evidence found in the aftermath of occupation is not always what it seems. Project curated by Robert MacLeod, USF Professor and Director of the School of Architecture and Community Design; organized by USFCAM.


RECEPTION INFORMATION
June 7, 7–9pm, USFCAM
Join us to celebrate the exhibition opening with artists and curators.
ART Thursday: Conversation with Curators of Occupying, Building, Thinking

June 20, 6–8pm, USFCAM
Join us for Conversation with the exhibition’s curators. Free refreshments provided.

Occupying, Building, Thinking: Curator’s Tour
June 27, 12pm, USFCAM

Visit CAM on your lunch break for a free guided tour of Occupying, Building, Thinking with IRA Curator Noel Smith.


Exhibition Hours: 10am–5pm M–F; 1–4pm Sat; Closed Sundays and USF Holidays; Free admission to all events

More information about events at USFCAM

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USFCAM Now a Blue Star Museum!

“We take care of one another. You take care of us. We take care of you. … As student veterans, you have only begun to write your story. You enrich the lives of our students, our professors, our staff.” USF President Judy Genshaft

“We take care of one another. You take care of us. We take care of you. … As student veterans, you have only begun to write your story. You enrich the lives of our students, our professors, our staff.” – USF President Judy Genshaft

On Tuesday, May 21st, the USF Contemporary Art Museum announced the launch of Blue Star Museums, a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 1,800 museums across America to offer free admission to all active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day 2013.

USF is one of the few universities in the nation with a standalone veterans department and is just one of a handful of schools that partner with the Pat Tillman veteran scholarship foundation. As USF President announced on Thurdsday in regards to USF’s New Achievement Center Ceremony, “We take care of one another. You take care of us. We take care of you. … As student veterans, you have only begun to write your story. You enrich the lives of our students, our professors, our staff.”

Although CAM already offers free admision to its visitors, but will be extending invitations and information about programs to veterans and members of the military. Leadership support has been provided by MetLife Foundation through Blue Star Families.

More about Blue Star Museums >>

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